Wednesday, September 28, 2016

week 33 baby (Alivia Constance Rodriguez-Miranda)

           Your baby's skeleton is hardening, but the bones in his skull are still separate. They can move and slightly overlap, which will make it easier for him to fit through the birth canal. (His head might temporarily look a little misshapen after the journey.) These bones don't fully fuse together until early adulthood, so your baby's skull can grow as his brain and other tissue expands during infancy and childhood.        
              This week your baby weighs a little over 4 pounds and has passed the 17-inch mark (about the size of a pineapple). He's rapidly losing that wrinkled, alien look, and his skeleton is hardening. The bones in his skull aren't fused together, which allows them to move and slightly overlap, thus making it easier for him to fit through the birth canal. (The pressure on the head during birth is so intense that many babies are born with a cone-head–like appearance.) These bones don't entirely fuse until early adulthood, so they can grow as his brain and other tissue expands during infancy and childhood.
           As your baby fills out even more of your belly, lots of things might start to change: Whereas before you were sashaying, you may find yourself waddling. Finding an easy position to sit in – let alone sleep – is becoming more of a challenge. And bumping into chairs and counters is par for the course.
            You may be feeling some achiness and even numbness in your fingers, wrists, and hands. Like many other tissues in your body, those in your wrist can retain fluid, which can increase pressure in the carpal tunnel, a bony canal in your wrist.
          Nerves that run through this "tunnel" may end up pinched, creating numbness; tingling, shooting or burning pain; or a dull ache. Try wearing a splint to stabilize your wrist or propping up your arm with a pillow when you sleep. If your work requires repetitive hand movements (at a keyboard or on an assembly line, for instance), remember to stretch your hands when you take breaks – which should be frequently.
            Many women still feel sexy at this stage – and their partners often agree. You may need to make some adjustments, but for most women, sex during pregnancy is fine right up until their water breaks or their labor starts.

week 32 baby (Alivia Constance Rodriguez-Miranda)

           It's getting crowded in there! You're gaining about a pound a week and roughly half of that goes straight to your baby, who's taking up more and more space in your uterus. In fact, she'll gain a third to half of her birth weight over the next seven weeks as she fattens up to prepare for life outside the womb. Her fingernails and toenails have grown in, and she's sporting hair – or at least some fluffy peach fuzz – on her head.
           By now, your baby weighs 3 3/4 pounds (about the size of a large jicama) and is about 16.7 inches long, taking up a lot of space in your uterus. You're gaining about a pound a week and roughly half of that goes right to your baby. She'll gain a third to half of her birth weight during the next 7 weeks as she fattens up for survival outside the womb. She now has toenails, fingernails, and real hair (or at least respectable peach fuzz). Her skin is becoming soft and smooth as she plumps up in preparation for birth.
           To accommodate your and your baby's growing needs, your blood volume has increased 40 to 50 percent since you got pregnant. And with your uterus pushing up near your diaphragm and crowding your stomach, the consequences may be shortness of breath and heartburn. To help relieve your discomfort, try sleeping propped up with pillows and eating smaller meals more often.
           You may have lower-back pain as your pregnancy advances. If you do, let your doctor or midwife know right away, especially if you haven't had back pain before, since it can be a sign of preterm labor.
           Assuming it's not preterm labor that's ailing you, you can probably blame your growing uterus and hormonal changes for your aching back. Your expanding uterus shifts your center of gravity and stretches and weakens your abdominal muscles, changing your posture and putting a strain on your back. Hormonal changes in pregnancy loosen your joints and the ligaments that attach your pelvic bones to your spine. This can make you feel less stable and cause pain when you walk, stand, sit for long periods, roll over in bed, get out of a low chair or the tub, bend, or lift things.

Saturday, September 10, 2016

everyone meet Alivia Constance Rodriguez-Miranda

my little baby's face. you can see the eyes, nose, and mouth. its so cute. this is my favorite out of the three.
my little baby's little foot. this is her father's favorite picture out of the three. 
now you all know for sure. little baby is a little girl for sure. :)

Everyone meet Alivia Constance Rodriguez-Miranda

week 31 baby (Alivia Constance Rodriguez-Miranda)

  Your baby can turn his head from side to side now. In fact, he's probably moving so much that you might be having trouble sleeping through all his kicks and somersaults. Take comfort: All this wriggling and jabbing is a sign that your baby is active and healthy. He's heading into a growth spurt now – his arms, legs, and body are beginning to plump out as needed fat accumulates underneath his skin. 
  This week, your baby measures over 16 inches long. He weighs about 3 1/3 pounds (about the size of a coconut) and is heading into a growth spurt. He can turn his head from side to side, and his arms, legs, and body are beginning to plump up as needed fat accumulates underneath his skin. He's probably moving a lot, too, so you may have trouble sleeping because your baby's kicks and somersaults keep you up. Take comfort: All this moving is a sign that your baby is active and healthy.
  Have you noticed the muscles in your uterus tightening now and then? Many women feel these random contractions – called Braxton Hicks contractions – in the second half of pregnancy. Often lasting about 30 seconds, they're irregular, and at this point, they should be infrequent and painless. Frequent contractions, on the other hand – even those that don't hurt – may be a sign of preterm labor. Call your doctor or midwife immediately if you have more than four contractions in an hour or any other signs of preterm labor. These include an increase in vaginal discharge or a change in the type of discharge (if it becomes watery, mucus-like, or bloody – even if it's pink or just tinged with blood); abdominal pain or menstrual-like cramping; an increase in pressure in the pelvic area; or low back pain, especially if you didn't have it before.
  You may have noticed some leaking of colostrum, or "premilk," from your breasts lately. If so, try tucking some nursing pads into your bra to protect your clothes. (If not, it's nothing to worry about. Your breasts are making colostrum even if you don't see any.) If your current bra is too snug, you might also want to pick up a nursing bra. Choose a nursing bra at least one cup size bigger than you need now. When your milk comes in, you'll be grateful for that extra room!
  If you're having a boy, you and your partner will want to take some time to think about whether or not to have your baby circumcised. Find out the pros and cons from your doctor, and what the procedure involves.

Saturday, September 3, 2016

week 30 for baby (Alivia Constance Rodriguez-Miranda)

  Your baby is surrounded by a pint and a half of amniotic fluid. This amount will start to shrink as she takes up more room in your uterus. Her eyesight continues to develop, but she won't see well until she's several months old. As a newborn, she'll be able to detect light and motion, and focus on things about 8 to 12 inches away – just right for gazing at your face when you hold her. Your baby should see clearly by her first birthday. 
  Your baby is about 15.7 inches long now and weighs almost 3 pounds (about the size of a large cabbage). A pint and a half of amniotic fluid surrounds her, but that volume will shrink as she gets bigger and takes up more room in your uterus. Her eyesight continues to develop, though it's not very keen; even after she's born, she'll keep her eyes closed for a good part of the day. When she does open them, she'll respond to changes in light but will have 20/400 vision – which means she can only make out objects a few inches from her face. (Normal adult vision is 20/20.)
  You may be feeling a little tired these days, especially if you're having trouble sleeping. You might also feel clumsier than normal, which is perfectly understandable. Not only are you heavier, but the concentration of weight in your pregnant belly causes a shift in your center of gravity. Plus, thanks to hormonal changes, your ligaments are more lax, so your joints are looser, which may also contribute to your balance being a bit off.
  Also, this relaxation of your ligaments can cause your feet to spread permanently, so you may have to invest in some new shoes in a bigger size. Remember those mood swings you had earlier in pregnancy? The combination of uncomfortable symptoms and hormonal changes can result in a return of those emotional ups and downs. It's normal to worry about what your labor will be like or whether you'll be a good parent. But if you can't shake the blues or feel increasingly irritable or agitated, talk to your doctor or midwife. You may be among the 1 in 10 expectant women who battle depression during pregnancy. Also let your healthcare provider know if you're frequently nervous or anxious.

Thursday, September 1, 2016

week 29 for baby (Alivia Constance Rodriguez-Miranda)

        Your baby is growing rapidly. He'll more than triple his weight between now and when he's born! His nutritional needs are highest this trimester, so continue to eat a healthy diet. Your baby's hardening skeleton absorbs about 250 milligrams of calcium every day. His muscles and lungs continue to mature, and his head is getting bigger to accommodate his growing brain – which is busy developing billions of neurons. 
  Your baby now weighs about 2 1/2 pounds (about the size of a butternut squash) and is a tad over 15 inches long from head to heel. His muscles and lungs are continuing to mature, and his head is growing bigger to make room for his developing brain. To meet his increasing nutritional demands, you'll need plenty of protein, vitamin C, folic acid, and iron. And because his bones are soaking up lots of calcium, be sure to drink your milk (or find another good source of calcium, such as cheese, yogurt, or enriched orange juice). This trimester, about 250 milligrams of calcium are deposited in your baby's hardening skeleton each day.
  Your baby's very active now. Your healthcare provider may ask you to spend some time each day counting kicks and will give you specific instructions on how to do this. Let your doctor or midwife know if you ever notice that your baby is becoming less active. You may need a nonstress test or biophysical profile to check on your baby.
  Some old friends – heartburn and constipation – may take center stage now. The pregnancy hormone progesterone relaxes smooth muscle tissue throughout your body, including your gastrointestinal tract. This relaxation, coupled with the crowding in your abdomen, slows digestion. Sluggish digestion can cause gas and heartburn – especially after a big meal – and contribute to constipation.
  Your growing uterus may also be contributing to hemorrhoids. These swollen blood vessels in your rectal area are common during pregnancy. Fortunately, they usually clear up in the weeks after giving birth.
  If they're itchy or painful, try soaking in warm water in a tub or a sitz bath or applying cold compresses medicated with witch hazel to the affected area. Avoid sitting or standing for long stretches. Talk with your healthcare provider before using any over-the-counter remedies during pregnancy, and let her know if you have any rectal bleeding. To prevent constipation, eat a high-fiber diet, drink plenty of water, and get regular exercise.
  Some women get something called "supine hypotensive syndrome" during pregnancy. This happens when lying flat on your back causes a change in heart rate and blood pressure that makes you feel dizzy until you change position. You might notice that you feel lightheaded if you stand up too quickly, too. To avoid "the spins," lie on your side rather than your back, and move slowly as you go from lying down to sitting and then standing.

Mama n Daddy

Mama n Daddy
The Proud Parents